Monthly Archives: September 2011

Teaching Tools

In the introduction to my thesis with the working title “Navigating Distributed Knowledge with the use of Web Tools” I wrote:“A major change in education has been the emergence of a distributed knowledge and the use of Internet in teaching practices. Humans have throughout history used tools to increase our understanding of the world. Social networks have always been part of our learning, but can be amplified by the tools we have available.”
Without the right tool, many tasks are difficult or impossible. One tool is not suited for all purposes, but a useful tool can inspire people to use it in different ways and better tools for specific jobs will constantly be developed.

Tool: Issuu Viewer

I have only started to play with this ‘Publishing Platform’.  The layout can be customized and the following functions has recently been added:

  • Publication button – Redirect readers to a prior issues, a library of back issues or your subscription site.
  • Heart button– What’s not to love? Garner support and adoration for products, issues, news, photos within your document.
  • Map button– Great for conference brochures and festival guides! Give readers maps and directions to your events, or just show them where you’re offices are.
  • Phone button– Link them right to your Skype account or direct phone line.
  • Support button– Lead readers to your FAQ, Help Desk, Customer Care, or other support services.
  • Cart button– Everyone’s favourite: buy! buy! buy! Link to you online store, etsy, subscription sign-up, or directly to the manufacturer’s site.
  • Print button– Simple one-click option to print
  • Navigate button– Way easier than our earlier hyperlinking tutorial, create easy table of contents and page jumps to articles.
  • Info button – Direct readers to your About page, Opening Hours, and well, all the info they’ll need.
  • Profile button – Share your Issuu profile with your readers and direct them to your other publications.
URL Description
http://issuu.com/action/openurl?url=url Go to URL
http://issuu.com/action/pagefirst Go to the first page
http://issuu.com/action/pagelast Go to the last page
http://issuu.com/action/pageprevious Go to the previous page
http://issuu.com/action/pagenext Go to the next page
http://issuu.com/action/page?page=pagenumber Go to a certain page number
http://issuu.com/action/index Open the index
http://issuu.com/action/fullscreen Switch to fullscreen
http://issuu.com/action/share Open the share window
http://issuu.com/action/print Open the print current pages window
http://issuu.com/action/flag Open the flag window
http://issuu.com/action/embed Open the embed wizard
http://issuu.com/action/info Open the information window
http://issuu.com/action/gotopublication Open the publication on issuu.com
http://issuu.com/action/comment Go the the document comments section
http://issuu.com/action/download Download the document
http://issuu.com/action/search Open the search window
http://issuu.com/action/zoom Zoom in/out
http://issuu.com/action/viewmode?mode=mode Change view mode. There’s three different layout’s available: magazine,presentation, and paper.

Deep Approach to Learning

Table 1 Compares the characteristics and factors that encourage Deep and Surface Approaches to learning. (Compiled from Biggs (1999), Entwistle (1988) and Ramsden (1992))
  Deep Learning Surface Learning
D
e
f
i
n
i
t
i
o
n
 
Examining new facts and ideas critically, and tying them into existing cognitive structures and making numerous links between ideas. Accepting new facts and ideas uncritically and attempting to store them as isolated, unconnected, items.
C
h
a
r
a
c
t
e
r
i
s
t
i
c
s
Looking for meaning.Focussing on the central argument orconcepts needed to solve a problem.Interacting actively.
Distinguishing between argument and evidence.Making connections between different modules.Relating new and previous knowledge.Linking course content to real life.
Relying on rote learning.Focussing on outwards signs and theformulae needed to solve a problem.Receiving information passively.Failing to distinguish principles from examples.Treating parts of modules and programmes as separate.Not recognising new material as building on previous work.Seeing course content simply as material to be learnt for the exam.
E
n
c
o
u
r
a
g
e
dbyS
t
u
d
e
n
t
s’
 
Having an intrinsic curiosity in the subject.Being determined to do well and mentally engaging when doing academic work.Having the appropriate background knowledge for a sound foundation.Having time to pursue interests, through good time management.Positive experience of education leading to confidence in ability to understand and succeed. Studying a degree for the qualification and not being interested in the subject.Not focussing on academic areas, but emphasising others (e.g. social, sport).Lacking background knowledge and understanding necessary to understand material.Not enough time / too high a workload.Cynical view of education, believing that factual recall is what is required.High anxiety.
E
n
c
o
u
r
a
g
e
dbyT
e
a
c
h
e
r
s’
Showing personal interest in the subject.Bringing out the structure of the subject.Concentrating on and ensuring plenty of time for key concepts.Confronting students’ misconceptions.Engaging students in active learning.Using assessments that require thought, and requires ideas to be used together.Relating new material to what students already know and understand.

Allowing students to make mistakes without penalty and rewarding effort.

Being consistent and fair in assessing declared intended learning outcomes, and hence establishing trust (see constructive alignment).

Conveying disinterest or even a negative attitude to the material.Presenting material so that it can be perceived as a series of unrelated facts and ideas.Allowing students to be passive.Assessing for independent facts (short answer questions).Rushing to cover too much material.Emphasizing coverage at the expense of depth.

Creating undue anxiety or low expectations of success by discouraging statements or excessive workload.

Having a short assessment cycle.

(Source: The Higher Education Academy)

Rubric for Martial Arts

A belt system in martial arts is used to show which students have trained longer and have more skill when compared to other students.  The grades are the “Student” Grades (referred to as Kyu Grades), and the Black Belts (Dan Grades) are considered “Expert” Grades.

level description
Yellow Striking Techniques: Using the head (Kubi-uchi), Using the hand (Oai-tsuki), Using the hammer fist (Tetsie-uchi), Using the back fist (Hiraken-uchi), Using the elbow (Empi-uchi), Using the palm heel (Teisho-uchi), Using the knee (Hiza-geri), Using the front kick (Mae-geri), Using the side kick (Yoko-geri), Using the stomping kick (Fuma-komo-geri), Using the back kick (Ushiro-geri)

Throwing Techniques: Shoulder throw (Seoi-nage), Floating hip throw (Uki-goshi), Advanced foot sweep (Deashi-harai)

Grappling Techniques: Scarf lock (Kesa-gatame), Normal Cross Choke (Name-juji-jime), Wrist lock (Kote-hineri)

Orange Striking Techniques: All previous plus Basic blocks against striking techniques

Throwing Techniques: All previous plus Major hip (O-goshi), Hip wheel (Koshi-guruma), Knee wheel (Hiza-guruma), Major outside reaping (Osoto-gari)

Grappling Techniques: All previous plus Shoulder hold (Kata-gatame), Reverse cross choke (Gyaku-juji-jime), Half cross choke (Kata-juji-jime), Bare hand choke (Hadaka-jime), chicken wing (Hiji-kime), Fore arm lock (Sempaku-gatame), Arm pit lock (Waki-gatame)

Green Striking Techniques: All previous
Throwing Techniques: All previous plus Supporting lift-pull foot (Sasae-tsurikomi-ashi), Major inner reap (Ouchi-gari)
Grappling Techniques: All previous plus Side hold (Yokoshiho-gatame), Sliding lapel choke (Okuri-eri-jime), Single wing choke (Kataha-jime), Under arm figure four (Tenkai-kote-hineri), Over arm figure four (Ude-garami)
Brown Striking Techniques: All previous
Throwing Techniques: All previous plus Body drop (Tai-otoshi), Shoulder wheel (Kata-guruma), Minor outer reap (Kosoto-gari), Minor inner reap (Kouchi-gari), Circle throw (Tomoe-nage)
Grappling Techniques: All previous plus Straddling hold (Tateshiho-gatame), Pump handle lock underarm (Ude-gatame), Pump handle lock overarm (Ude-hineri), Over shoulder lock (Ude-gatame), Stomach bar (Hara-gatame), Cross lapel lock (Te-gatame)

Defensive Situations: Wrist lock (Kote-gaeshi), Straight punch arm bar (Ude-gatame), Moving foot sweep (Ko-soto-gari), shoulder throw (Seoi-nage), Step on toes, Foot sweep (Ko-soto-gari), Inside block to inner reap throw (O-uch-gari), Outer reaping throw (O-soto-gari), Wrist lock (Kote-gaeshi), Floor arm bar, Thumb jamb, Knuckle against the hand, Scissoring the thumb, Wrist lock (Kote-gaeshi), Break through thumb, Arm bar (Sempaku-gatame), Wrist lock  (Kote-hineri), Dislocate thumb

Brown 2nd
Black

(Source: Heike-Ryu Syllabus)

Rubric for Language Skills

The “Common European Framework of Reference for Languages: Learning, Teaching, Assessment”, CEFR, is a guideline used to describe achievements of learners of foreign languages acrossEurope.

level description
A1 Can understand and use familiar everyday expressions and very basic phrases aimed at the satisfaction of needs of a concrete type. Can introduce him/herself and others and can ask and answer questions about personal details such as where he/she lives, people he/she knows and things he/she has. Can interact in a simple way provided the other person talks slowly and clearly and is prepared to help.
A2 Can understand sentences and frequently used expressions related to areas of most immediate relevance (e.g. very basic personal and family information, shopping, local geography, employment). Can communicate in simple and routine tasks requiring a simple and direct exchange of information on familiar and routine matters. Can describe in simple terms aspects of his/her background, immediate environment and matters in areas of immediate need.
B1 Can understand the main points of clear standard input on familiar matters regularly encountered in work, school, leisure, etc. Can deal with most situations likely to arise whilst travelling in an area where the language is spoken. Can produce simple connected text on topics which are familiar or of personal interest. Can describe experiences and events, dreams, hopes & ambitions and briefly give reasons and explanations for opinions and plans.
B2 Can understand the main ideas of complex text on both concrete and abstract topics, including technical discussions in his/her field of specialisation. Can interact with a degree of fluency and spontaneity that makes regular interaction with native speakers quite possible without strain for either party. Can produce clear, detailed text on a wide range of subjects and explain a viewpoint on a topical issue giving the advantages and disadvantages of various options.
C1 Can understand a wide range of demanding, longer texts, and recognise implicit meaning. Can express him/herself fluently and spontaneously without much obvious searching for expressions. Can use language flexibly and effectively for social, academic and professional purposes. Can produce clear, well-structured, detailed text on complex subjects, showing controlled use of organisational patterns, connectors and cohesive devices.
C2 Can understand with ease virtually everything heard or read. Can summarise information from different spoken and written sources, reconstructing arguments and accounts in a coherent presentation. Can express him/herself spontaneously, very fluently and precisely, differentiating finer shades of meaning even in the most complex situations.

(Source: wikipedia 2011)

Acquired skills in Social Media #eci831

I have started to evaluate the skills I have acquired in Social Media and will create a tick-box list.  Educators who want support can contact me and if you want to share your knowledge of skills that I’m still in progress with I will be more than happy to get in touch!

  •  Used a specially designed portal with search engines (Ex. Resources linked to course literature or developed by university department)

  • Joined news channels with specific information (Ex. RSS feeds, Atom, Google Reader)

 Subscribe to RSS and blog feeds in Google Reader

  • Helped other users by rating or evaluating the resources you found on the Internet (Ex. Diigo, Amazon)
  • Used online multimedia resources as additional material (Ex. SlideShare, I-Tunes, YouTube, Flickr)
  • Developed shared bookmarks together with teachers or students (Ex. Del.icio.us, Furl, Citeulike …)
  • Used micro-blog to post updates and insights (Ex. Twitter)
  • Used a blog or interactive website in your teaching or course development (Ex. WordPress, Blogger, Facebook, MySpace)
  • Used collaborative writing with teachers or students (Ex. Google docs, Wikispaces, PBworks, Zoho docs)
  • Attended to webinar or video chat (Ex. Illuminate, Skype)
  • Uploaded presentations from your own teaching (Ex. PowerPoint, SlideShare)

New Personal Learning Environment #change11

I have changed my digital identity from being an “Innovative Teacher” to become an “Education Coach”.  I’m aiming to share my experience on facilitating teachers open online learning and formulate my new reflections during #Change11 in this new blog called “EduToolkit”. 

(this is my previous PLE)

Online Learning Collaborations (#eduMOOC)

This is a link to the Wikispace for the study group on the topic “Online Learning Collaborations” , which was part of the eduMOOC 2011 focused on “Online Learning Today…and Tomorrow” coordinated by Ray Schroeder from The Center for Online Learning, Research and Service at the University of Illinois Springfield.

My interest was on the topic “Collaboration with Online Tools”:

Collaborations are facilitated by a variety of on-line tools.  The term ‘Social Tools’ can be defined as “An application that can be accessed via the web or other Internet technology, that can have more than one user present in the same environment (preferably at the same time, but not limited to that). Where the users can create and exchange artefacts with each other and ideally collaborate in the creation and exchanging of theses artefacts” (Stephen Downes in the Webinar “Facilitating Social Interactions”)